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Prepare yourself, your family and your community... for an emergency, a disaster, or just everyday life

Build an Emergency Kit - a "Stay" box for sheltering in place in your home and a "Go" bag if you have to evacuate your home

Make a Disaster Plan

Create your own Emergency Financial First Aid Kit (requires Adobe Acrobat Reader)

Mark your Cell phone with an ICE contact

Hazards

Prepare your vehicle for winter

Special Alerts for Fanwood

Set your clocks forward in the spring

Set your clocks back in the fall

 

Be Red Cross Ready!

Prepárate con la Cruz Roja!

Click on the above links to watch internet videos on what you need to prepare for a disaster - in English or Spanish.

You can also visit www.Prepare.org which has disaster preparedness information in English and these languages, too:

 

 

If any of these links are broken, please let us know.

Take a free safety course

 

Return to the Fanwood CERT Homepage

 

 

Make a Disaster Plan

 

Consider developing a disaster plan with your household members to prepare for what to do, how to find each other, and how to communicate in an emergency.

 

bulletDecide where your household will reunite after a disaster. Identify three places to meet: one right outside your home (the nearest fire hydrant is a good spot), another outside your immediate neighborhood, such as a library, community center, or place of worship and finally a third location out of state (relative's home, hotel/motel off a major highway, etc.).
bulletIdentify all possible exit routes from your home and neighborhood, especially local roads that won't be mentioned on the radio as escape routes.
bulletIf you work in NYC, identify alternate routes of transportation out of the city - which may include having an alternate meeting spot (like a 24 hour diner near the Hudson River) where your family can meet you.
bulletDesignate an out-of-state friend or relative that household members can call if separated during a disaster. If our local phone circuits are busy, long-distance calls may be easier to make. This out-of-state contact can help you communication with others. Always keep some spare change available because you may have better luck with pay telephones than with your cell phone, in the event of an emergency.
bulletAccount for everybody's needs, especially seniors, people with disabilities, and non-English speakers. Make sure to include copies of prescriptions (including eyeglass and contact lenses) with your "go" bag.
bulletEnsure that household members have a copy of your household disaster plan and emergency contact information to keep in their wallets, briefcases and backpacks.
bulletPractice your plan with all household members.

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Winterize Your Car

Before winter sets in, have a mechanic check the following items on your vehicle:

bulletBattery
bulletAntifreeze
bulletWindshield wipers and washer fluid (check for ice melting capability)
bulletIgnition system
bulletThermostat
bulletLights (headlamps and hazard lights)
bulletExhaust system, heater, brakes, defroster
bulletOil level (if necessary, replace oil with a winter oil or SAE 10w/30 variety)

Install good winter tires that have adequate tread. All-weather radials are usually adequate for most winter conditions. However, some jurisdictions require vehicles to be equipped with chains or snow tires with studs.

Regardless of the season, it's a good idea to prepare for an in-car emergency. Here's a list of items we you should have in your vehicle - especially if you are traveling during bad weather that may strand you:

bulletBlankets, sleeping bags, extra newspapers for insulation
bulletPlastic bags (for sanitation)
bulletExtra mittens, socks, scarves and hat, raingear and extra clothes
bulletDrinking water and non-perishable food
bulletFirst Aid Kit
bulletFlashlight (change batteries at least twice a year or use a non-battery powered flashlight)
bulletWhistle
bulletPersonal hygiene items: soap, feminine hygiene products, toothbrush and toothpaste, etc.
bulletChild Care supplies and other special care items, including a set of prescription medication that should also be changed often based on expiration
bulletSack of sand or kitty litter for gaining traction under wheels, small shovel
bulletSet of tire chains or traction mats
bulletWorking jack and lug wrench, spare tire
bulletWindshield scraper, broom
bulletSmall tools (pliers, wrench, screwdriver)
bulletBooster cables
bulletBrightly colored cloth to use as a flag, flares or reflective triangles

If You Must Drive a Vehicle

Whenever possible, avoid driving in a winter storm. If you must go out, it is safer to take public transportation. However, if you must drive or get caught in a storm, heed the following tips:

bulletAvoid traveling alone, but if you do so, let someone know your destination, route and when you expect to arrive.
bulletDress warmly. Wear loose-fitting, lightweight clothing in layers.
bulletListen to the radio or call the state highway patrol for the latest road conditions.
bulletUse major streets or highways for travel whenever possible; these roadways will be cleared first.
bulletDrive slowly. Posted speed limits are for ideal weather conditions. Vehicles take longer to stop on snow and ice than on dry pavement.
bulletFour-wheel drive vehicles may make it easier to drive on snow-covered roads, but they do not stop quicker than other vehicles.
bulletIf you skid, steer in the direction you want the car to go and straighten the wheel when the car moves in the desired direction.
bulletKnow your vehicle's braking system. Vehicles with antilock brakes require a different braking technique than vehicles without antilock brakes in icy or snowy conditions.
bulletTry to keep your vehicle's gas tank as full as possible.

IF YOU GET STUCK ON THE ROAD:

bulletStay with your car. Do not try to walk to safety unless help is visible within 100 yards. You could become disoriented in blowing snow.
bulletDisplay a trouble sign if you need help; tie a brightly colored cloth to the antenna and raise the hood to alert rescuers.
bulletStart the car and use the heater for about 10 minutes every hour. Keep the exhaust pipe clear of snow to avoid the risk of carbon monoxide poisoning.
bulletLeave the overhead light on when the car is running so you can be seen.
bulletMove your arms and legs to keep blood circulating and to stay warm.
bulletKeep one window slightly open to let in fresh air. Use a window that is opposite the direction the wind is blowing.

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Set your clocks forward in the spring and other things to do in March

 

Set your clocks forward one hour Change the batteries in your smoke detectors Change the batteries in your carbon monoxide detectors

Check your "Go" Bag

Check your "Stay" Box
Check timers, thermostats, etc. as well as the clock in your car. Many devices have automatic time adjustments that will be off a week (they will move the clock forward on the first Sunday in April instead of the second Sunday in March), so devices like your computer, PDA, watches, etc. may be an hour off for the time between the old change date and the new one.  Change the batteries in all of your smoke detectors.  Give them a quick vacuum if you can or use an air duster to clean out any dust. If they are more than five years old, consider replacing them completely. It's a good time to test/check all of your home fire extinguishers, too. If you have electric ones, turn off the circuit breaker and press the test button to make sure they work with the power off. Be sure to turn the circuit breaker back on afterwards! Change the batteries in all of your carbon monoxide detectors, too.  Give them a quick vacuum if you can or use an air duster to clean out any dust. If they are more than five years old, consider replacing them completely. If you have electric ones, turn off the circuit breaker and press the test button to make sure they work with the power off. Be sure to turn the circuit breaker back on afterwards! Now is a good time to check the expiration dates on items you have in your "Go" bag such as food, water, prescription/non-prescription medicine, etc. Also check your back up copies of prescriptions (medicines, eye glasses, etc.) to make sure they are current. Rotate out stock of items that have less than six months to expire. Add new items to your "Go" bag. Click here for a list of suggestions. This is also a great time to review with family where your evacuation meeting place is located, if everyone gets separated or has to evacuate from different locations to one central spot. Now is also a good time to check the expiration dates on items you have in your "Stay" box such as food, water, batteries,  prescription/non-prescription medicine, etc.  Rotate out stock of items that have less than six months to expire. Add new items to your "Stay" box. Click here for a list of suggestions. This is also a great time to check your home and car for hazards and also do some spring safety reviews of your home as well.
Remind your family and friends to also follow these safety checks. They can visit our web site to find out all of the details, too.

 

Go Back to the top of this page

Set your clocks backward in the fall and other things to do in November

Set your clocks back one hour Change the batteries in your smoke detectors Change the batteries in your carbon monoxide detectors

Check your "Go" Bag

Check your "Stay" Box
Check timers, thermostats, etc. as well as the clock in your car. Many devices have automatic time adjustments that will be off a week (they will move the clock back on the last Sunday in October instead of the first Sunday in November), so devices like your computer, PDA, watches, etc. may be an hour off for the time between the old change date and the new one. Change the batteries in all of your smoke detectors.  Give them a quick vacuum if you can or use an air duster to clean out any dust. If they are more than five years old, consider replacing them completely. It's a good time to test/check all of your home fire extinguishers, too. If you have electric ones, turn off the circuit breaker and press the test button to make sure they work with the power off. Be sure to turn the circuit breaker back on afterwards! Change the batteries in all of your carbon monoxide detectors, too.  Give them a quick vacuum if you can or use an air duster to clean out any dust. If they are more than five years old, consider replacing them completely. If you have electric ones, turn off the circuit breaker and press the test button to make sure they work with the power off. Be sure to turn the circuit breaker back on afterwards! Now is a good time to check the expiration dates on items you have in your "Go" bag such as food, water, prescription/non-prescription medicine, etc. Also check your back up copies of prescriptions (medicines, eye glasses, etc.) to make sure they are current. Rotate out stock of items that have less than six months to expire. Add new items to your "Go" bag. Click here for a list of suggestions. This is also a great time to review with family where your evacuation meeting place is located, if everyone gets separated or has to evacuate from different locations to one central spot. Now is also a good time to check the expiration dates on items you have in your "Stay" box such as food, water, batteries,  prescription/non-prescription medicine, etc.  Rotate out stock of items that have less than six months to expire. Add new items to your "Stay" box. Click here for a list of suggestions. This is also a great time to check your home and car for hazards and also do some winterizing of your home as well.
Remind your family and friends to also follow these safety checks. They can visit our web site to find out all of the details, too.